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. the attacks happened at a time when tensions are high between the u.s. and india's ah enemy pakistan. reza, what is the strategy of multiple bombs in multiple locations? tell us about both the motive and the likely perpetrators of these attacks. >> well, it certainly bears the hallmarks of a group like lashkar-e-taiba, of course, the group responsible for the devastating 2008 attack on mumbai. at the same time, i think investigators are saying that the relatively small scale of this attack and the fact that the bombs were rather crude. there were actually ieds, martin, incates that it could be an indigenous terror organization, an organization known as the indian mujahadin which may or may not have links to lashkar-e-taiba but that remains to be seen. no one has accepted responsibility just yet. >> you say these were small devices, but 21 people killed, and at least 113 injured is not small. secretary of state hillary clinton is scheduled to visit india next week, but the united states is currently in a very tense situation with india's rival pakistan, as you know. does the u.s. have to tr
, in pakistan rather. >> today we honor a singular act of gallantry. as we near the 10th anniversary of the attacks thrust our nation into war, it is the occasion to pay tribute to a soldier and a generation that has borne the burden of our security during a hard decade of sacrifice. i want to take you back to the circumstances that led to this day. it is may 26, 2008. in the remote eastern afghanistan, near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of a lead army rangers race over the rugged landscape. and their target is an insurgent, down. the mission is high risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touched down, and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes, leroy -- then a staff sergeant -- and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that is when the enemy opens up with their a k-47's. leroy is hit in both legs. he's bleeding badly. but he s
terrorist through security. even with bin laden's debt at the compound in may, pakistan is the base for the al-qaeda core leadership, including ayad allawi the egyptian doctor who replaced the al-qaeda leader. pakistan's ability to track known and suspected terrorists is substandard. >> it is stunning that pakistan which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism does not even share finger print data within the own government. >> while information sharing and passport security improved in the u.s., former homeland security official says the disparity overseas remains a serious problem. >> the travel documents are the same as weapons, terrorists that can't carry off the plot without them. if i give us a grade abroad with the partners, some of is it out of our control, we're probably closer to a "c." >> some former intelligence officials say the u.s. should use leverage to encourage standards. for some nations it's resource problems. for otherssh it's refusal to cooperate. >> bret: thank you. the speaker of the house joins me live in studi hi, anne. how are you doing? hi,
a pakistan on this particular trip. did he talk about what pakistan was not on his itinerary? guest: he did not talk about that specifically. it was very focused on afghanistan, but also on the border between afghanistan and pakistan. he did not say specifically why he did not go. i think it is pretty clear for a couple of reasons. the u.s. is trying to gauge just how much cooperation they can get from pakistan going forward. pakistan has a lot of u.s. trainers that have been working intensely with their special forces, and as a result of that, withheld some of the decade that went with them. they also repelled some of the partnership on the war on terrorism, so to speak. they are still trying to gauge that. for now, in the past, the key relationship between the u.s. and pakistan and the military have been between admiral mullen and his pakistan counterpart, the army chief of staff. i think that this point, the u.s. is still trying to weigh what they can do to move this cooperation forward with pakistan. host: the defense policy reporter a bloomberg news, thank you for being on the "washing
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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